Emphasizing Equity-based Approaches

Grow Your Own educator programs are a potential strategy for states and district to employ to help recruit and retain teachers of color. GYO programs help address teacher shortages, retention issues and teacher diversity by engaging in a variety of strategies that aim to recruit teachers from local communities in hopes that the pool of candidates will increase in diversity and will be more likely to stay teaching in the community.

Equitable approaches and critical perspectives can combine the powerful roles of “homegrown” teachers, culturally-relevant curriculum, and social justice pedagogy in addressing achievement and opportunity gaps, especially for the nation’s woefully underserved, largely urban schools serving students of color

Equity Connection is IDRA’s online Community of Practice where educators, researchers, parents and community members to discuss and take action to strengthen public schooling. See the discussion on grow your own programs now!

Literature Review Summary

Angela Valenzuela, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, developed this two-page summary of her literature review “Grow Your Own Educator Programs – A Review of the Literature with an Emphasis on Equity-based Approaches.”

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Literature Review

This literature review provides an overview of the research on Grow Your Own (GYO) educator programs as a strategy for states and district to employ to help recruit and retain teachers of color. It emphasizes equitable approaches and critical perspectives that combine the powerful roles of “homegrown” teachers, culturally-relevant curriculum and social justice pedagogy in addressing achievement and opportunity gaps, especially for the nation’s woefully underserved, largely urban schools serving students of color.

This review begins with a summary of the vast inequities in the representation of teachers in color in our nation’s primary and secondary schools. It next defines important terms in GYO scholarship, such as pathways, pipelines, and partnerships (Gist, Bianco, & Lynn, in press).

Next follows a discussion of community solidarity, which provides helpful language for distinguishing GYO models like those examined here, from perhaps many, if not most, university-based teacher preparation programs in the United States (Zeichner, 2016; Kretchmar & Zeichner, 2016).

The review ends with a summary of specific GYO-program types that could potentially not only increase equity in terms of the number of teachers of color entering the profession but also help ensure that those teachers are critically conscious leaders (Valenzuela, 2016).

See Literature Review

See the full literature review developed for the IDRA EAC-South by Angela Valenzuela, Ph.D., of the University of Texas at Austin.

“Grow Your Own Educator Programs – A Review of the Literature with an Emphasis on Equity-based Approaches.”

Special Edition

This special edition on strategies highlights a grow your own educator program involving a community-based partnership with a local school district to carry out the work of a Saturday academy for fourth- and fifth-graders.

See Special Edition

See the special edition developed for the IDRA EAC-South by Angela Valenzuela, Ph.D., of the University of Texas at Austin.

Grow Your Own Educator Programs – Special Edition: A Roadmap to a Community-Based, Partnership Approach